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1940s [2017/06/19 07:02]
jenni
1940s [2017/11/10 05:52] (current)
jenni
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 ==== Computer Development During The 1940s ==== ==== Computer Development During The 1940s ====
 ===1947=== ===1947===
-{{wiki:​cathode-ray-tube-amusement-schematic.png}} \\ The schematics from the patent. ​\\ No working replica exists. | The **Cathode-ray tube amusement device** was the earliest known electronic game, although it didn't use a computer to play.  It was designed by two physicists, Thomas T. Goldsmith, Jr. and Estle Ray Mann, while they were working for DuMont Laboratories. ​ They constructed the game with analog electronics and filed a patent for it in 1947, but it was never displayed publicly and was never sold. \\ \\ The game, inspired by World War II radar displays, was a combat game where the goal was to fire an artillery shell at enemy aircraft. ​ The game simply consisted of a cathode ray tube that projected a spot on an oscilloscope. ​ A plastic overlay was placed over the display, which represented the enemy aircraft. ​ The beam, representing an artillery shell, was arched, and became dimmer as it reached the end of its trajectory. ​ The goal was to aim the beam so that it dimmed while it was over the enemies. Since there was no computer involved, the score had to be self-calculated. |+[[Image:​cathode-ray-tube-amusement-schematic.png|350px]] ​\\ The schematics from the patent. No working replica exists. | The '''​Cathode-ray tube amusement device''' ​was the earliest known electronic game, although it didn't use a computer to play.  It was designed by two physicists, ​[[Thomas T. Goldsmith, Jr.]] and [[Estle Ray Mann]], while they were working for DuMont Laboratories. ​ They constructed the game with analog electronics and filed a patent for it in [[1947]], but it was never displayed publicly and was never sold. \\ \\ The game, inspired by World War II radar displays, was a combat game where the goal was to fire an artillery shell at enemy aircraft. ​ The game simply consisted of a cathode ray tube that projected a spot on an oscilloscope. ​ A plastic overlay was placed over the display, which represented the enemy aircraft. ​ The beam, representing an artillery shell, was arched, and became dimmer as it reached the end of its trajectory. ​ The goal was to aim the beam so that it dimmed while it was over the enemies. Since there was no computer involved, the score had to be self-calculated. |

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