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arcade [2017/08/13 16:43]
jenni created
arcade [2018/08/29 00:46] (current)
66.24.191.157 adding early history
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-An '''​Arcade'''​ is a location that has coin-operated games to play.  They can be a dedicated arcade locationor consist of one or more coin-operated games inside a business such as a bar or a restaurant.  ​+An '''​Arcade'''​, also known as an '''​amusement arcade'''​ or a '''​video arcade''', ​is a location that has coin-operated games to play.  They can be a dedicated arcade location or consist of one or more coin-operated games inside a business such as a bar or a restaurant.  ​ 
 + 
 +The earliest arcades were called '''​penny arcades''',​ as pennies were the original currency used in coin-operated games. The earliest use of the term in print appeared in the May 17, 1902 edition of ''​The Saint Paul Globe'',​ referring to William Kelley'​s penny arcade in Saint Paul, Minnesota. The penny arcade at Eldridge Park in Elmira, NY first appeared in print in the April 9, 1923 edition of Star-Gazette. It was one of the longest continuously running arcades in the world when Eldridge Park closed in 1989. 
 + 
 +The games played in the penny arcades were non-electrical,​ and some scored points or performed tasks through mechanical means while others were manual. The most popular penny arcade games included:  
 +*Bagatelles (a billiards game developed in France in 1777 in which the goal is to get a set number of balls past stationary pegs into holes guarded by also guarded by stationary pegs). The version popular in penny arcades incorporated these changes to the game: 
 +**In 1871, the English-American inventor [[Montague Redgrave]] was awarded a patent for improvements to bagatelles that replaced the billiards cue with a spring-loaded plunger, decreased the size of the game so that it would fit atop a counter, changed the balls from billiard balls to marbles, and changed large wooden pegs to small metal pins. 
 +*Coin-operated fortune telling machines 
 +*Coin-operated music players: 
 +**music boxes 
 +**player-pianos 
 +**jukeboxes 
 +***Amberolas that played wax cylinder records (Blue Amberol Records were introduced in 1912, replacing the 4 minute Black Amberol Records introduced in 1980, that in turn replaced the wax cylinders introduced in 1888) 
 +***Phonographs that played records (Vinyl records were introduced in 1931, replacing shellac records that were introduced in 1895) 
 +***Later jukeboxes used cassette tapes, compact discs, or digital media such as MP3 (MPEG-1 (Moving Picture Experts Group) and MPEG-2 Audio Layer III) files. 
 +*Coin-operated shooting games 
 +*Mutoscopes (early machines that displayed motion pictures in a similar method as flip books) 
 +*Pachinko and pinball games, derived from bagatelles. 
 +**Pin games evolved into the game commonly known as pinball with the addition of electromechanical games with active bumpers in 1933 and with the addition of flippers in 1947.  
 +**Pinball machines began using microprocessors in 1976.  
 +***Pachinko games only used electric for lighting, until roughly this time, when some began to have electromechanical features and/or microprocessors. 
 +*Peep show machines (in the non-pornographic vernacular relating to the ability to see photographs and pictures through the machine) 
 +*Slot machines 

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