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bertie_the_brain [2018/05/12 13:47]
66.24.100.113 created
bertie_the_brain [2018/05/12 13:48] (current)
66.24.100.113 adjusting layout
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-==== Computer Development During The 1950s ==== 
-===1950=== 
 | [[File:​bertie-the-brain.png|150px]] \\ [[File:​bertie-the-brain-back.png|150px]] \\ Photos from its 1950 display. \\ No working replica exists. ​   | '''''​Bertie the Brain'''''​ was the earliest known computer game, as well as the earliest known computer arcade game.  It was a game of tic-tac-toe,​ which is also known as noughts and crosses or Xs and Os. \\ \\ It was designed by an engineer named Josef Kates in the Canadian city of Toronto, ​ Ontario. The game was displayed, by the Rogers Majestic Corporation,​ at the Canadian National Exhibition from the 25th of August to the 9th of September in 1950. Despite its significance,​ it was dismantled immediately afterward. \\ \\ Its designer, Josef Kates, was born on May 5, 1921 in Austria, the fifth child of an Austrian-Jewish family. ​ He fled to Italy in 1938 to escape the Nazis, and then joined the rest of his family in England in 1938.  Upon arriving in England, he and his family were interned as enemy aliens, and were sent to internment camps in Canada in the provinces of New Brunswick and Quebec. They, along with the other Austrian Jewish families, stayed in internment for two years until they were recognized by the Canadian government as victims of Nazi aggression, and released. While interned, he earned his high school diploma through McGill University'​s matriculation program, placing first in Quebec'​s province-wide examinations.\\ \\ After graduation, he attended the University of Toronto, receiving a Masters degree in Applied Math and a Ph. D. in Physics. He worked for the Imperial Optical Company of Toronto in 1942, before joining the Rogers Majestic Corporation in 1944.  This is where he developed //Bertie the Brain//, using a miniature vaccuum tube of his own design, known as the Additron tube. The Additron tube was never produced, and was never used publicly outside of its use in this game. | | [[File:​bertie-the-brain.png|150px]] \\ [[File:​bertie-the-brain-back.png|150px]] \\ Photos from its 1950 display. \\ No working replica exists. ​   | '''''​Bertie the Brain'''''​ was the earliest known computer game, as well as the earliest known computer arcade game.  It was a game of tic-tac-toe,​ which is also known as noughts and crosses or Xs and Os. \\ \\ It was designed by an engineer named Josef Kates in the Canadian city of Toronto, ​ Ontario. The game was displayed, by the Rogers Majestic Corporation,​ at the Canadian National Exhibition from the 25th of August to the 9th of September in 1950. Despite its significance,​ it was dismantled immediately afterward. \\ \\ Its designer, Josef Kates, was born on May 5, 1921 in Austria, the fifth child of an Austrian-Jewish family. ​ He fled to Italy in 1938 to escape the Nazis, and then joined the rest of his family in England in 1938.  Upon arriving in England, he and his family were interned as enemy aliens, and were sent to internment camps in Canada in the provinces of New Brunswick and Quebec. They, along with the other Austrian Jewish families, stayed in internment for two years until they were recognized by the Canadian government as victims of Nazi aggression, and released. While interned, he earned his high school diploma through McGill University'​s matriculation program, placing first in Quebec'​s province-wide examinations.\\ \\ After graduation, he attended the University of Toronto, receiving a Masters degree in Applied Math and a Ph. D. in Physics. He worked for the Imperial Optical Company of Toronto in 1942, before joining the Rogers Majestic Corporation in 1944.  This is where he developed //Bertie the Brain//, using a miniature vaccuum tube of his own design, known as the Additron tube. The Additron tube was never produced, and was never used publicly outside of its use in this game. |

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